Prof. Peter K. Yu

Professor of Law

Co-Director, Center for Law and Intellectual Property

Texas A&M University School of Law


 

 

conferences

 

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, AND ENDANGERED SPECIES: UNDERSTANDING THE DYNAMICS OF THE INFORMATION ECOSYSTEM

 

Michigan State University-DCL College of Law

 

March 26-27, 2004

 

DESCRIPTION

 

The past decade has seen an enormous expansion of intellectual property protection. This expansion has recently caught the attention of mainstream media and the general public. Those on the one side of the public debate emphasize the need to preserve a rich public domain, thus ensuring free access to and distribution of valuable information and raw materials. Those on the other side of the debate, however, query the impracticality of this position and underscore the strong need for incentives to encourage authors and inventors to create. Some of them also maintain that authors and inventors deserve legal protection of property entitlements arising from their creative or inventive labor.

 

Intellectual property regimes seek to balance these competing goals by providing limited exclusive rights that are qualified by public interest safeguards. The key question in the information age is not whether we should have intellectual property regimes (although that question is important and worth exploring), but how we can achieve sustainable development of intellectual property—how we can meet our current needs while preserving the potential for future generations to meet their own needs.

 

To help us understand our complex information ecosystem, this conference brings together intellectual property scholars, communications policy experts, property theorists, economists, political scientists, environmental activists, and policymakers from WIPO and the WTO. Among the issues addressed are the balance between intellectual property protection and the public domain, broadband platforms and media access, the tension between real and intellectual property theories, biological and cultural diversity, technology transfer among developed and less developed countries, and open-source software and innovation barriers.

 

SCHEDULE

 

March 26, 2004

 

8:30

Breakfast

 

9:00

Welcoming Remarks

  • Dean Terence L. Blackburn, Michigan State University College of Law

  • Prof. Peter K. Yu, Michigan State University College of Law

9:20

Copyright, Diversity and Democracy

 

Moderator:

  • Prof. Jane Briggs-Bunting, School of Journalism, Michigan State University

Speakers:

  • Prof. Doris E. Long, John Marshall Law School

  • Prof. Siva Vaidhyanathan, Department of Culture and Communication, New York University

  • Prof. Marshall W. Van Alstyne, School of Information, University of Michigan

  • Prof. Silke von Lewinski, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Patent, Copyright and
    Competition Law (Germany)

11:00

Coffee Break

 

11:20

Broadband Platforms, Open Access and Digital Content

 

Moderator:

  • Prof. Steven S. Wildman, Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies and Media, Michigan State University

Speakers:

  • Prof. Johannes M. Bauer, Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies and Media, Michigan State University

  • Prof. Adam Candeub, Federal Communications Commission; Michigan State University College of Law (beginning Fall 2004)

  • Prof. Brett Frischmann, Loyola Univeresity Chicago School of Law

  • Prof. James B. Speta, Northwestern University School of Law

  • Prof. Philip J. Weiser, University of Colorado School of Law

1:00

Luncheon

 

2:30

Fair Use and Access Rights

 

Moderator:

  • Prof. Howard B. Abrams, University of Detroit-Mercy School of Law

Speakers:

  • Prof. Ann Bartow, University of South Carolina School of Law

  • Prof. Margaret Chon, Seattle University School of Law

  • Prof. Justin Hughes, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University

  • Prof. Glynn S. Lunney, Jr., Tulane Law School

  • Prof. Alfred C. Yen, Boston College Law School

4:30

Coffee Break

 

4:45

Black Acre and Black Beauty: Strange Bedfellows or a Happy Marriage?

 

Moderator:

  • Prof. David S. Favre, Michigan State University College of Law

Speakers:

  • Prof. Richard A. Epstein, University of Chicago Law School

  • Prof. Wendy J. Gordon, Boston University School of Law

  • Prof. Adam Mossoff, Michigan State University College of Law

  • Prof. Stewart E. Sterk, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University

  • Prof. Molly S. Van Houweling, University of Michigan Law School

6:30

Friday Sessions Adjourned

 

7:00

Dean's Dinner Reception

 

March 27, 2004

 

8:30

Breakfast

 

9:00

Open Source, Open Content: Solutions or Problems?

 

Moderator:

  • Prof. Llewellyn J. Gibbons, The University of Toledo College of Law

Speakers:

  • Prof. Richard J. Enbody, College of Engineering, Michigan State University

  • Prof. Brian Kahin, School of Information Studies, University of Michigan

  • Dan Ravicher, Esq., Executive Director, Public Patent Foundation

  • Prof. Greg Vetter, University of Houston Law Center

10:45

Coffee Break

 

11:00

Technology Transfer and Global Harmony

 

Moderator:

  • Dr. Frederic Erbisch, Former Director, Office of Intellectual Property, Michigan State University

Speakers:

  • Prof. Keith Aoki, University of Oregon School of Law

  • Prof. William O. Hennessey, Franklin Pierce Law Center

  • Prof. F. Scott Kieff, Washington University School of Law

  • Prof. Karim Maredia, Institute of International Agriculture, Michigan State University

  • Prof. Keith E. Maskus, Department of Economics, University of Colorado—Boulder

  • Prof. Ruth Gana Okediji, University of Minnesota Law School

  • Jayashree Watal, Intellectual Property Division, World Trade Organization

1:00

Luncheon

 

2:30

Biodiversity, Traditional Knowledge and Sustainable Development

 

Moderator:

  • Prof. Rebecca Bratspies, Michigan State University College of Law

Speakers:

  • Prof. Jim Chen, University of Minnesota School of Law

  • Prof. Gavin Clarkson, School of Information, University of Michigan

  • Prof. Daniel J. Gervais, University of Ottawa Faculty of Law

  • Prof. Laurence R. Helfer, Loyola Law School—Los Angeles

  • Prof. Charles R. McManis, Washington University School of Law

  • Prof. Nicholas Mercuro, Michigan State University College of Law

4:30

Coffee Break

 

4:45

Competition Law and Innovation Barriers

 

Moderator:

  • Richard Owens, Executive Director, Centre for Innovation Law & Policy, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Speakers:

  • Prof. Shubha Ghosh, University at Buffalo Law School, SUNY

  • Prof. Jacqueline D. Lipton, Case Western Reserve University School of Law

  • Prof. Jonathan Putnam, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

6:45

Closing Remarks

  • Prof. Peter K. Yu, Michigan State University College of Law

7:30

Dinner Reception

 

Restaurant Villegas

1735 Grand River Avenue, Okemos, MI

 

CONFERENCE FELLOWS

 

Prof. Xinming Cao

Zhongnan University of Economics and Law (China)

 

Prof. Christine D. Galbraith

University of Maine School of Law


Prof. Debora Halbert

Department of History and Political Science

Otterbein College of Law


Prof. Rita S. Heimes

Suffolk University Law School (visiting)


Prof. Katherine J. Strandburg

DePaul University College of Law

 

SYMPOSIUM ISSUE AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS

 

2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 1–308

 

Peter K. Yu, Intellectual Property and the Information Ecosystem, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 1

 

Johannes M. Bauer, Junghyun Kim & Steven S. Wildman, An Integrated Framework for Assessing Broadband Policy Options, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 21

 

Jim Chen, Biodiversity And Biotechnology: A Misunderstood Relation, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 51

 

Margaret Chon, Intellectual Property and the Development Divide, 27 Cardozo L. Rev. 2821 (2006)

 

Richard A. Epstein, The Roman Law of Cyberconversion, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 103

 

Brett M. Frischmann, Infrastructure Commons, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 121

 

Brett M. Frischmann, An Economic Theory of Infrastructure and Commons Management, 89 Minn. L. Rev. 917 (2005)

 

Daniel Gervais, Traditional Knowledge & Intellectual Property: A TRIPS-Compatible Approach, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 137

 

Llewellyn Joseph Gibbons, Digital Bowdlerizing: Removing the Naughty Bytes, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 167

 

Bill Hennessey, Changing Traffic Patterns in Technospace, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 201

 

Jacqueline Lipton, The Law of Unintended Consequences: The Digital Millennium Copyright Act and Interoperability, 62 Wash & Lee L. Rev. 487 (2005)

 

Doris Estelle Long, Traditional Knowledge and the Fight for the Public Domain, 5 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 317 (2006)

 

Keith E. Maskus, Using The International Trading System to Foster Technology Transfer for Economic Development, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 219

 

Lars Smith, Trade Distinctiveness: Solving Scalia's Tertium Quid Trade Dress Conundrum, 2005 Mich. St. L. Rev. 243

 

Stewart E. Sterk, Intellectualizing Property: The Tenuous Connections Between Land and Copyright, 83 Wash. U. L. Q. 417 (2005)

 

Molly Shaffer Van Houweling, Distributive Values in Copyright, 83 Tex. L. Rev. 1535 (2005)

 

Greg R. Vetter, "Infectious" Open Source Software: Spreading Incentives or Promoting Resistance?, 36 Rutgers L.J. 53 (2004)

 
  ..... .....  

Last Updated: 18/07/15

© 2001 Peter K. Yu
Designed and maintained by Peter Yu
Web Policy